Conspiracy Theories, Misinformation, and Political Extremism

  1. Are Republicans and Conservatives More Likely to Believe Conspiracy Theories?” Forthcoming. With Christina Farhart, Joanne Miller, Kyle Saunders, Joseph E. Uscinski, and Hugo Drochon. Political Behavior.

  2. Have Beliefs in Conspiracy Theories Increased Over Time?” Forthcoming. With Joseph E. Uscinski, Casey Klofstad, Hugo Drochon, Michelle Seelig, Kamal Premaratne, and Manohar Murthi. PLOS One.

  3. Sociopolitical and Psychological Correlates of COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy in the United States During Summer 2021.” Forthcoming. With Joseph E. Uscinski, Casey Klofstad, and Justin Stoler. Social Science & Medicine.

  4. Cause and Effect: On the Antecedents and Consequences of Conspiracy Theory Beliefs.” Forthcoming. With Joseph E. Uscinski, Casey Klofstad, and Justin Stoler. Current Opinion in Psychology.

  5. Who Supports Political Violence?  Forthcoming. With Miles T. Armaly. Perspectives on Politics.

  6. The Impact of Social Desirability on Conspiracy Belief Measurement Across Cultures.  Forthcoming. With Steven M. Smallpage, Joseph E. Uscinski, and Hugo Drochon. Political Science Research and Methods.

  7. The Relationship between Social Media Use and Beliefs in Conspiracy Theories and Misinformation.  Forthcoming. With Joseph E. Uscinski, Michelle Seelig, Casey Klofstad, Stephan Wuchty, John Funchion, Manohar Murthi, Kamal Premaratne, and Justin Stoler. Political Behavior.

  8. Who Supports QAnon? A Case Study in Political Extremism. 2022. With Joseph E. Uscinski, Michelle Seelig, Casey Klofstad, Justin Stoler, John Funchion, Caleb Everett, Stephan Wuchty, Kamal Premaratne, and Manohar Murthi. Journal of Politics 84(3): 1844–1849.

    • Coverage: New York Times, The Guardian

  9. American Politics in Two Dimensions: Partisan and Ideological Identities versus Anti-Establishment Orientations.” 2021. With Joseph E. Uscinski, Michelle Seelig, Casey Klofstad, John Funchion, Caleb Everett, Stephan Wuchty, Kamal Premaratne, and Manohar Murthi. American Journal of Political Science 65(4): 877–895.

  10. The Role of Anti-Establishment Orientations during the Trump Presidency.” 2021. With Joseph E. Uscinski. The Forum 19(1): 47–76.

  11. The 2020 Presidential Election and Accusations of Fraud: Continuity or Change?” Forthcoming. With Joseph E. Uscinski, Michelle Seelig, Casey Klofstad, John Funchion, Caleb Everett, Stephan Wuchty, Kamal Premaratne, and Manohar Murthi. Electoral Studies 72: 102366.

  12. Do Conspiracy Beliefs Form a Belief System? Examining the Structure and Organization of Conspiracy Beliefs.” 2021. With Joseph E. Uscinski, Michelle Seelig, Casey Klofstad, John Funchion, Caleb Everett, Stephan Wuchty, Kamal Premaratne, and Manohar Murthi. Journal of Social and Political Psychology 9(1).

  13. Are Misinformation, Anti-scientific Claims, and Conspiracy Theories for Political Extremists?” 2021. With Joseph E. Uscinski. Group Processes & Intergroup Relations 24(4): 583–605.

    • Special issue, “'We don’t believe you': A group processes approach to anti-science beliefs and endorsement of alternative facts”

  14. The Different Forms of COVID-19 Misinformation and Their Consequences.” 2020. With Joseph E. Uscinski, Casey Klofstad, and Justin Stoller. The Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) Misinformation Review.

  15. “Are All 'Birthers' Conspiracy Theorists?: On the Relationship Between Conspiratorial Thinking and Political Orientations.” 2020. With Steven M. Smallpage and Robert N. Lupton. British Journal of Political Science 50(3): 849–866.

  16. Why Do People Believe COVID-19 Conspiracy Theories? 2020. With Joseph E. Uscinski, Michelle Seelig, Casey Klofstad, John Funchion, Caleb Everett, Stephan Wuchty, Kamal Premaratne, and Manohar Murthi. The Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) Misinformation Review.

    • Coverage: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver

  17. Conspiratorial Thinking and Political Constraint.” 2019. Public Opinion Quarterly 83(3): 510–533.

  18. “Informational Cues, Partisan Motivated Reasoning, and the Manipulation of Conspiracy Beliefs.” 2019. With Steven M. Smallpage. Political Communication 36(1): 83–102.​​​​

  19. Who Are Conspiracy Theorists? A Comprehensive Approach to Explaining Conspiracy Beliefs.” 2019. With Steven M. Smallpage. Social Science Quarterly 100(6): 2017–2032.

  20. On the Measurement of Conspiracy Beliefs.” 2018. With Steven M. Smallpage. Research & Politics January-March: 1-4.

  21. “Polls, Plots, and Party Politics: Conspiracy Theories in Contemporary America.” 2018. With Steven M. Smallpage. In Conspiracy Theories and the People Who Believe Them. Joseph E. Uscinski (Editor). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. 

  22. The Partisan Contours of Conspiracy Theory Beliefs.” 2017. With Steven M. Smallpage and Joseph E. Uscinski. Research & Politics October-December: 1–7.

Polarization and Contemporary Political Culture

  1. Filling in the Gaps: False Memories and Partisan Bias.” Forthcoming. With Miles T. Armaly. Political Psychology.

  2. Polarization in Black and White: An Examination of Racial Differences in Polarization and Sorting Trends.” Forthcoming. With Judd R. Thornton. Public Opinion Quarterly.

  3. Christian Nationalism and Political Violence: Victimhood, Racial Identity, Conspiracy, and Support for the Capitol Attacks.” Forthcoming. With Miles T. Armaly and David T Buckley. Political Behavior.

  4. “'Why Me?’ The Role of Perceived Victimhood in American Politics.” Forthcoming. With Miles T. Armaly. Political Behavior.

  5. On Modeling the Social-Psychological Foundations of Support for Donald Trump.” 2022. With Joseph E. Uscinski. American Politics Research 49(6): 551-567.

  6. Say It Again With Feeling: Issue Ownership and Candidate Communication Using Twitter.” 2022. With Jason Gainous and Kevin M. Wagner. Social Science Quarterly (103)4: 959-974.

  7. Affective Polarization and Support for the U.S. Supreme Court.” 2022. With Miles T. Armaly. Political Research Quarterly 75(2): 409-424.

  8. No Home Court Advantage: The Impeachment Trial and Attitudes Toward the U.S. Supreme Court.” 2021. With Miles T. Armaly. Research and Politics January–December 2021.

  9. Issues vs. Affect: How Do Elite and Mass Polarization Compare? 2021. Journal of Politics 83(4): 1873-1877.

  10. Value Extremity Contributes to Affective Polarization in the U.S. 2021. With Robert N. Lupton. Political Science Research and Methods 9(4): 857–866.

  11. The Role of Affective Orientations in Promoting Perceived Polarization. 2021. With Miles T. Armaly. Political Science Research and Methods 9(3): 615-626.

  12. Values and Political Predispositions in the Age of Polarization: Examining the Relationship between Partisanship and Ideology, 1988-2012.” 2020. With Robert N. Lupton and Steven M. Smallpage. British Journal of Political Science 50(1): 241–260.

  13. The Differential Effects of Actual and Perceived Polarization.” 2019. With Miles T. Armaly. Political Behavior 41(3): 815–839.

  14. “Ideology and Core Values.” 2017. With Robert N. Lupton and William G. Jacoby. In The SAGE Handbook of Electoral Behaviour, Volume II. Kai Arzheimer, Jocelyn Evans, Michael S. Lewis-Beck (Editors). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 

Race, Racial Attitudes, and the Measurement of Racial Prejudice

  1. Biased Interviewer Assessments of Respondent Knowledge Based on Perceptions of Skin Tone.” Forthcoming. With Judd R. Thornton. Journal of Race, Ethnicity, and Politics.

  2. Racial Resentment, Electoral Loss, and Satisfaction with Democracy Among Whites in the United States: 2004–2016.” Forthcoming. With Judd R. Thornton. Political Behavior.

  3. The Limits of Medical Trust in Mitigating COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy Among Black Americans.” 2021. With Justin Stoler, Casey Klofstad, and Joseph E. Uscinski. Journal of General Internal Medicine May 21: 1–3.

  4. A Matter of Principle? On the Relationship Between Racial Resentment and Ideology.” 2021. Political Behavior 43(2): 561–584.

  5. “The Increasing Racialization of American Electoral Politics, 1988-2016.” 2019. With Jamil S. Scott. American Politics Research 47(2): 275–303.